VERONICA FALLS-NEW/ROCK/ALBUM/LANÇAMENTO

Veronica Falls

portuguese and english

 

No final do video do  “Bad Fellings”Roxanne Clifford, a vocalista ruiva que toca guitarra e com influencias da  polka. O recente indie rock cometando
Veronica Falls no final do video há uma curiosidade segundo a matéria

tem iconoclastico momento George Michael

https://i2.wp.com/www.reverbcity.com/images/editor/veronica-falls.jpg

Veronica Falls banda hybrida  de londrinos e escoses fez muita gente  ouvir certos como  Found Love In a Graceyard feito a dois nmaos atrás e tembém veio Beachy Head e Bad felling e Come On Over neste ano

At the end of the video for Veronica Falls’ “Bad Feeling“, Roxanne Clifford, the group’s bob-haired singer/guitarist, clad in a dashingly fey polka-dot blouse, picks up an antique book– the ultimate twee signifier– and lights it on fire. Given indie rock’s recent jangle-pop overload, and the comments that Veronica Falls have made in the press (“people like to romanticize about C86 [but] there were lots of rubbish bands associated with it…”), it’s tempting to wonder aloud: is “Bad Feeling” the C86 version of that video where George Michael goes iconoclastic on us and sets his own leather jacket ablaze?

Well, maybe not, but at the very least it’s a decent visual metaphor for the band’s sound: expertly stagy revivalism with the slightest hint of mutiny. You could have said the same thing of Slumberland labelmates and fellow fresh-faced indie poppers the Pains of Being Pure at Heart when they first burst out the gates with Pastels badges on their sleeves– the quartet’s self-titled debut hits with the same sort of immediacy that that first Pains LP did. Both records do familiar things so well that, occasionally, momentarily, they actually trick you into thinking you’ve never heard anything like them before.

But, of course, you have. In fact, if you’ve been paying any attention to Glasgow/London hybrid Veronica Falls, you’ve actually heard some of these very songs before: The single “Found Love in a Graveyard” made the rounds almost two years ago, and then came “Beachy Head”, “Bad Feeling“, and “Come on Over” earlier this year. But after a run of strong 7″‘s, their self-titled debut finally confirms that Veronica Falls are more than a singles band. Though they operate with a pretty limited sonic palette (boy/girl harmonies; dueling, reverb-drenched guitars; lots of tambourine), there’s a sustained momentum over these 12 tracks that even manages to bring in some unexpected influences– “Beachy Head” sounds like a zombified Mamas and the Papas thrashing at surf-punk guitars with shards of glass.

Given the group’s penchant for ghosts and reverb, it’s tempting to grab for a familiar collection of low-hanging adjectives: dreamy, ethereal, haunting– except that, actually, Veronica Falls is none of these things. There’s a striking physicality to these songs, and Guy Fixsen and Ash Workman’s production makes every tambourine beat hit with the clarity of a shattering window. The guitar sound is immaculate: Clifford and James Hoare’s strings don’t jangle so much as bristle– taut chords that dart restlessly in and out of each other’s way. There’s a clarity of texture– a specificity even– to every element of the band’s sound. Which makes it something of an anomaly: shoegaze that looks you square in the eye.

Thematically speaking, shit’s dark. There’s a song called “Misery”, there are not one but two songs in which the narrator’s lover might be a ghost (“Graveyard”, “Bad Feeling”), and though “Beachy Head” might sound like a carefree postcard from indie rock’s current backdrop of choice, it’s actually about jumping off a cliff and drowning yourself. Thankfully, the record ends on a high in every sense: “Come on Over” is perhaps the most hopeful– and best– track the band’s got to their name. “Crimson and clover, I’ll touch your shoulder,” Clifford sings over the mounting tension of a furiously strummed guitar. It’s the Veronica Falls aesthetic in miniature: the ghosts of pop past conjured convincingly and intimately enough to feel like flesh and blood.

http://veronicafalls.com/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s